top of page

Top 10 Things to consider before signing a Construction Contract



  1. Scope of work: Make sure that the contract clearly defines the scope of work to be completed, including all materials and services to be provided.The scope of work in a construction contract is a detailed description of the tasks, materials, and services that will be provided by the contractor as part of the project. It should be as specific as possible to ensure that both parties have a clear understanding of what is expected. The scope of work should include a list of all work to be performed, the materials and equipment that will be used, and any subcontracted work. It may also include details such as the schedule for completion, the quality standards that will be used, and any warranties or guarantees provided by the contractor. The scope of work is an important part of the contract because it helps to ensure that the project is completed on time and to the specified standards.

 

  1. Payment terms: Understand how and when you will be expected to make payments and under what circumstances.Payment terms in a construction contract outline how and when the owner of the project will make payments to the contractor. These terms are usually based on the completion of certain milestones or the delivery of specific materials or services. For example, a contractor may be paid a percentage of the total contract price upon completion of the foundation, with additional payments made at the completion of subsequent stages of the project. Alternatively, the contractor may be paid in installments based on the value of the work completed, as determined by the owner or an independent third party. Payment terms may also include provisions for retaining a percentage of the total contract price until the project is complete and any defects have been corrected. It is important for the owner to understand the payment terms in the contract to ensure that they are fair and reasonable, and that the contractor will be paid for the work they have completed.

 

  1. Change orders: Be aware of the process for requesting and approving changes to the scope of work, as well as any potential additional costs.A change order in construction is a written document that modifies the scope of work or contract price in a construction project. Change orders may be necessary due to unforeseen circumstances, changes in the owner's requirements, or errors or omissions in the original contract. They can be used to add or delete work, extend the timeline for completion, or adjust the contract price. Variations in construction refer to any changes to the scope of work that are requested by the owner or are required due to circumstances beyond the control of the contractor. These changes may be made through the use of change orders or through a separate agreement between the parties. It is important for the owner to carefully review and consider any requested variations to ensure that they are necessary and reasonable, and that they do not significantly impact the timeline or budget for the project.

 

  1. Schedule: The contract should include a timeline for completion of the project, including any milestones and deadlines.A schedule in construction is a timeline that outlines the planned sequence of activities for a project. It may include specific dates for the start and completion of each task, as well as any milestones or deadlines that need to be met. The schedule is an important tool for managing the project and ensuring that it is completed on time. It can help to identify potential bottlenecks or delays, and allows the contractor to allocate resources and personnel appropriately. The schedule should be regularly reviewed and updated to reflect the actual progress of the work, and any changes to the timeline should be documented through the use of change orders.

 

  1. Warranty: Make sure that the contract includes a warranty period during which the contractor is responsible for any defects in their work.A warranty in construction is a promise by the contractor to repair or correct any defects in their work within a specified period of time after the project is completed. Warranties may be provided for materials, labor, or both, and may be offered for a specific duration, such as one year or five years. The terms of the warranty should be clearly stated in the contract, including the scope of the work covered, the duration of the warranty, and the process for making a claim. It is important for the owner to understand the terms of the warranty in order to know what to expect in the event that problems arise with the work.

 

  1. Insurance: The contractor should have insurance coverage in case of accidents or injuries that occur on the job.Insurance coverage in construction is a protection against financial loss or liability that may arise from accidents or injuries that occur on the job. It is typically the responsibility of the contractor to obtain and maintain the appropriate insurance coverage for the project. This may include general liability insurance, which covers damages to third parties or their property; workers' compensation insurance, which covers medical expenses and lost wages for employees who are injured on the job; and builder's risk insurance, which covers damages to the project itself. It is important for the owner to verify that the contractor has the required insurance coverage before work begins, and to ensure that the coverage is adequate for the specific risks associated with the project.In Ireland, contractors are required to carry certain types of insurance coverage in order to protect against potential losses or liabilities that may arise from construction projects. These may include:Employer's liability insurance: This covers the contractor for damages or injuries sustained by employees while working on the project.

  • Public liability insurance: This covers the contractor for damages or injuries sustained by third parties (such as members of the public) as a result of the contractor's work.

  • Professional indemnity insurance: This covers the contractor for any errors or omissions made in the course of their work, and may be required for certain types of projects or professions.

  • Contractor's all risks insurance: This covers the contractor for damages to the project itself, as well as any materials or equipment used in the work.

  • It is important for contractors to have the appropriate insurance coverage in place to protect themselves and their clients in the event of an accident or injury on the job.

 

7. Termination: The contract should outline the circumstances under which either party can terminate the agreement, as well as any associated fees. In Ireland, a construction contract can be terminated by either party if certain conditions are met. The contract may include specific provisions for termination, such as if the other party breaches the agreement or fails to fulfill their obligations. If the contract does not include specific termination provisions, then the general laws of contract termination in Ireland will apply. Under Irish law, either party may terminate a contract if the other party has committed a material breach of the agreement. A material breach is a serious violation of the contract that goes to the heart of the agreement and renders it impossible to perform. A party may also be entitled to terminate the contract if the other party becomes insolvent or otherwise unable to fulfill their obligations under the agreement. If a construction contract is terminated, the parties may be entitled to recover damages for any losses incurred as a result of the termination. It is important for both parties to carefully review the terms of the contract and seek legal advice if there is a dispute about termination.

 


8. Dispute resolution: The contract should specify how disputes will be resolved, such as through mediation or arbitration.Dispute resolution in construction in Ireland refers to the process for resolving conflicts or disagreements that may arise between the parties to a construction contract. There are several methods of dispute resolution that may be used, including negotiation, mediation, and arbitration. Negotiation is a process in which the parties to the dispute try to reach a mutually acceptable resolution through direct communication and discussion. This is often the first step in resolving a dispute, and may be successful if the parties are able to communicate effectively and find common ground. Mediation is a process in which an independent third party, known as a mediator, helps the parties to the dispute reach a mutually acceptable resolution. The mediator does not have the power to make a decision, but rather facilitates communication and helps the parties to find a solution that meets their needs. Arbitration is a process in which an independent third party, known as an arbitrator, reviews the facts of the dispute and makes a decision that is binding on the parties. Arbitration can be a faster and more cost-effective alternative to litigation, but it is generally more formal and may not be suitable for all disputes. It is important for the parties to a construction contract to consider their dispute resolution options and choose the method that is most appropriate for their needs.

 


9. Indemnification: The contractor may require you to indemnify them for any claims or damages arising from the work. Make sure you understand the extent of this indemnification.Indemnification in construction refers to the obligation of one party to compensate the other party for any losses or damages that may arise as a result of the work performed under the contract. Indemnification provisions are commonly included in construction contracts to protect the owner from liability for claims made by third parties, such as subcontractors or suppliers. For example, the contractor may agree to indemnify the owner for any claims made against the owner for damages or injuries that result from the contractor's work. The indemnification provision may also require the contractor to defend the owner against any such claims. It is important for the owner to understand the scope and limitations of the indemnification provision in the contract, as well as any exclusions or exceptions that may apply. The owner should also ensure that the indemnification provision is fair and reasonable, and that it does not expose the owner to undue risk or liability.


Indemnification provisions in construction contracts in Ireland are governed by the general principles of Irish contract law. Indemnification provisions are commonly used to allocate risk between the parties and to protect the owner from liability for claims made by third parties, such as subcontractors or suppliers. Under Irish law, an indemnification provision is generally enforceable as long as it is clear and unambiguous, and does not contravene any applicable laws or public policy. The parties to a construction contract in Ireland may agree to indemnify each other for any losses or damages that may arise as a result of the work performed under the contract, as long as the indemnification provision is fair and reasonable. It is important for the parties to carefully review and understand the indemnification provisions in a construction contract in Ireland, and to seek legal advice if there are any questions or concerns.

 


10. Compliance with laws and regulations: The contractor should be responsible for ensuring that all work is performed in accordance with applicable laws and regulations.In Ireland, builders and contractors are required to comply with a number of laws and regulations that apply to construction projects. These may include health and safety regulations, building codes, environmental laws, and employment laws, among others. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations can result in fines, penalties, and other legal consequences.

It is the responsibility of the builder or contractor to ensure that they are complying with all applicable laws and regulations. This may include obtaining the necessary permits and approvals, following relevant health and safety protocols, and disposing of materials and waste in an environmentally responsible manner.

It is important for builders and contractors to be aware of their legal obligations and to make sure that they are complying with all relevant laws and regulations. Owners of construction projects should also ensure that the contractors they hire are complying with these requirements to protect themselves from liability and to ensure that the project is completed safely and to the required standards.

 





Commentaires


Featured Posts
Recent Posts
Archive
Search By Tags
Follow Us
  • Facebook Basic Square
  • Twitter Basic Square
  • Google+ Basic Square
bottom of page