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The role of the quantity surveyor in Pre Contract vs Post Contract phases.


Quantity Surveying is a crucial aspect of any construction project, and Quantity Surveyors play an essential role in ensuring that projects are completed on time, within budget, and to the desired quality standards. The role of a Quantity Surveyor can be broadly divided into two phases - Pre Contract and Post Contract. Each phase has its distinct responsibilities, and this blog will highlight the key differences between the two.

Pre Contract Phase

The Pre Contract phase begins with the initial planning stage and continues until the award of the contract. During this phase, Quantity Surveyors play a pivotal role in developing a cost plan for the project. Some of the key responsibilities of a Quantity Surveyor during the Pre Contract phase are:

  1. Cost Planning: One of the primary responsibilities of a Quantity Surveyor during the Pre Contract phase is to develop a detailed cost plan for the project. This involves estimating the costs of materials, labor, and equipment required to complete the project, along with overheads, contingencies, and other indirect costs.

  2. Tendering: Once the cost plan is in place, Quantity Surveyors will be involved in the tendering process, which includes preparing and issuing tender documents, evaluating tenders, and recommending the best tenderer.

  3. Contract Negotiation: Quantity Surveyors also play a vital role in negotiating the contract terms and conditions with the successful tenderer, ensuring that the terms are fair and balanced.

  4. Risk Management: Risk management is a crucial aspect of the Pre Contract phase, and Quantity Surveyors are responsible for identifying and mitigating risks that could impact the project's cost, quality, or schedule.

  5. Value Engineering: Quantity Surveyors may also be involved in the value engineering process, which involves finding cost-effective solutions to achieve the desired project outcomes.

Post Contract Phase

The Post Contract phase begins once the contract has been awarded and continues until the final account has been settled. During this phase, Quantity Surveyors are responsible for managing costs and ensuring that the project is delivered within budget. Some of the key responsibilities of a Quantity Surveyor during the Post Contract phase are:

  1. Cost Control: One of the primary responsibilities of a Quantity Surveyor during the Post Contract phase is to monitor costs and ensure that the project is delivered within budget. This involves tracking actual costs against the cost plan, identifying any cost overruns, and taking corrective action to keep costs under control.

  2. Variations: Quantity Surveyors are also responsible for managing variations, which are changes to the scope of work that may impact the project's cost or schedule. This involves assessing the cost and time implications of variations and negotiating with the contractor to ensure that they are completed within budget.

  3. Payment Certificates: Quantity Surveyors are responsible for preparing payment certificates for the contractor, which detail the work completed and the amount payable.

  4. Final Account: The final account is prepared at the end of the project, and Quantity Surveyors are responsible for ensuring that all costs are accounted for and that the final account is settled in a timely manner.

  5. Dispute Resolution: In the event of a dispute between the contractor and the client, Quantity Surveyors may be involved in the resolution process, providing expert advice on the cost implications of different outcomes.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the role of a Quantity Surveyor is critical to the success of any construction project. During the Pre Contract phase, Quantity Surveyors are responsible for developing a cost plan, tendering, contract negotiation, risk management, and value engineering. During the Post Contract phase, Quantity Surveyors are responsible for cost control, managing variations, preparing payment certificates, final account settlement, and dispute resolution. While the responsibilities of a Quantity Surveyor may differ between the two phases, the ultimate goal remains the same - to deliver the project on time, within budget, and to the desired quality




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