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Understanding the Key project life cycle stages & whole life cost (of a building).


The life cycle of a building typically consists of several stages, including:

  1. Planning and design: During this stage, the project team develops the overall concept and design for the building. This may involve site selection, analysis of the local environment, and consultation with stakeholders.

  2. Pre-construction: This stage includes activities such as obtaining financing and regulatory approvals, developing detailed construction plans and specifications, and securing contractors and materials.

  3. Construction: The actual physical construction of the building takes place during this stage.

  4. Occupancy and use: Once the building is completed, it is occupied and used by the intended occupants. This stage may also include ongoing maintenance and repair work.

  5. Demolition or decommissioning: At the end of a building's useful life, it may be demolished or decommissioned, depending on the circumstances.

Whole life cost (WLC) is a term used to describe the total cost of a building over its entire life cycle, including planning and design, construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. WLC analysis is a tool used to help decision-makers evaluate the long-term financial implications of different options and make informed choices about building projects. It is typically used in the planning and design stage of a project to help ensure that the most cost-effective options are chosen.


Whole life cost (WLC) refers to the total cost of a building over its entire life cycle, including all stages from planning and design through to decommissioning. Project life cycle cost (PLCC) is a similar concept that refers to the total cost of a project over its entire life cycle, including all stages from planning and design through to operation and maintenance. In both cases, the goal is to evaluate the long-term financial implications of different options and make informed decisions about the project. However, while WLC specifically refers to the cost of a building, PLCC can be used to evaluate the cost of any type of project, not just buildings.

Both WLC and PLCC take into account the full range of costs associated with a project, including direct costs such as materials and labor, and indirect costs such as financing and ongoing maintenance. They also consider the time value of money, which means that costs are adjusted to reflect the fact that money has a different value at different points in time due to factors such as inflation.

By considering the full range of costs over the entire life cycle of a project, WLC and PLCC provide a more comprehensive and accurate picture of the financial implications of different options, which can help decision-makers make more informed and cost-effective choices.


There are several reasons why WLC analysis is important in construction:

  1. It helps to identify the most cost-effective options: By considering the full range of costs over the entire life cycle of a building, WLC analysis can help identify the options that will be the most cost-effective in the long run.

  2. It promotes sustainable and efficient design: WLC analysis can help encourage the use of sustainable and energy-efficient design and construction practices, which can lead to lower operating costs over the life of the building.

  3. It helps to optimize maintenance and repair: WLC analysis can help identify the most cost-effective maintenance and repair strategies, which can help extend the life of the building and reduce costs over time.

  4. It supports long-term planning and decision-making: WLC analysis provides a comprehensive and long-term perspective on the costs of a building project, which can be helpful for decision-makers in planning for the future.

Overall, WLC analysis is an important tool for ensuring that building projects are cost-effective and sustainable in the long run, and it is widely used in the construction industry to support informed decision-making.


 


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